20 9 / 2014

robynochs:

SUBMIT TO THE BI WOMEN QUARTERLY!

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: The theme for the Spring 2015 issue of the Bi Women Quarterly will be “Intersection: Spirituality/Religion.”

Tell us: How has your religious upbringing and or current spiritual understanding / practice affected your experience /…

16 9 / 2014

queer-ink:

a Queer Ink Publishing project
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
THE QUEER FEMININITY PROJECT
Calling all femmes with pens!
Maybe you grew up being teased by the other kids for being a boring old girly-girl. Maybe you’re tired of “brainless bimbo” and “pretty princess” stereotypes. Maybe you tried being more like the boys, and just didn’t get what’s so great about it. Maybe you don’t understand why people dressed in skirts and flowery dresses are not supposed to be loud and proud—you kick butt, whether you wear boots or stilettoes. Maybe you’re sick of the assumption that “feminine” equals “addicted to fashion and beauty treatments”. Maybe you’re a feminist wondering what your femininity means to you—because you sure don’t agree with the way society defines it. Or maybe you’re that guy, the one who’s been mocked for being feminine his whole life and doesn’t see why “You’re such a girl!” is a bad thing. Maybe you thought you had transcended mainstream society’s unwritten laws of gender and restrictive definitions of femininity when you embraced your queerness—and suddenly you found yourself in a parallel framework, dealing with the same old  ideas painted in new words.Maybe you thought: Oh hells no. This ends here.Accounts from all over the world are beginning to trickle in about sexism present in queer communities; preliminary research suggests as many as 60% of feminine-presenting female individuals of any sexual orientation experience femmephobia. The world seems to have let out a collective sigh: it’s time to talk about how we relate to one another within our communities as well as without.But that’s the world. We’re interested in you.We’re charting this conversation as it applies to South Asia—our stories, our lives, our problems, and our triumphs. Can we critique communities that are already under threat without being declared traitors? How do we forge an authentic identity when so many of us are rendered invisible by both society and our communities? How do we define ourselves in the face of such great pressure to conform to someone or the other’s idea of acceptably traditional or acceptably radical? Can a borrowed vocabulary communicate our most intimate thoughts and feelings? Is it possible to live a South Asian, femme, and queer life—in our own image, on our own terms? We live in a world of labels. Some of them are handed to us before we even know what they mean. And others we wear proudly, the hard-won battle scars of our struggle to name ourselves.But one thing is for sure:You’re here, you’re queer, and you’ve got a story to share. Tell it to us.
Details Here

queer-ink:

a Queer Ink Publishing project

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

THE QUEER FEMININITY PROJECT

Calling all femmes with pens!

Maybe you grew up being teased by the other kids for being a boring old girly-girl. Maybe you’re tired of “brainless bimbo” and “pretty princess” stereotypes. Maybe you tried being more like the boys, and just didn’t get what’s so great about it. Maybe you don’t understand why people dressed in skirts and flowery dresses are not supposed to be loud and proud—you kick butt, whether you wear boots or stilettoes. Maybe you’re sick of the assumption that “feminine” equals “addicted to fashion and beauty treatments”. Maybe you’re a feminist wondering what your femininity means to you—because you sure don’t agree with the way society defines it. Or maybe you’re that guy, the one who’s been mocked for being feminine his whole life and doesn’t see why “You’re such a girl!” is a bad thing. Maybe you thought you had transcended mainstream society’s unwritten laws of gender and restrictive definitions of femininity when you embraced your queerness—and suddenly you found yourself in a parallel framework, dealing with the same old  ideas painted in new words.

Maybe you thought: Oh hells no. This ends here.

Accounts from all over the world are beginning to trickle in about sexism present in queer communities; preliminary research suggests as many as 60% of feminine-presenting female individuals of any sexual orientation experience femmephobia. The world seems to have let out a collective sigh: it’s time to talk about how we relate to one another within our communities as well as without.

But that’s the world. We’re interested in you.

We’re charting this conversation as it applies to South Asia—our stories, our lives, our problems, and our triumphs. Can we critique communities that are already under threat without being declared traitors? How do we forge an authentic identity when so many of us are rendered invisible by both society and our communities? How do we define ourselves in the face of such great pressure to conform to someone or the other’s idea of acceptably traditional or acceptably radical? Can a borrowed vocabulary communicate our most intimate thoughts and feelings? Is it possible to live a South Asian, femme, and queer life—in our own image, on our own terms?

We live in a world of labels. Some of them are handed to us before we even know what they mean. And others we wear proudly, the hard-won battle scars of our struggle to name ourselves.

But one thing is for sure:

You’re here, you’re queer, and you’ve got a story to share. Tell it to us.

Details Here

(via fuckyeahlgbtqartists)

16 9 / 2014

transqueermediaexchange:

BOSTON (AP) — Women’s colleges are revisiting policies around enrolling transgender students as institutions of higher learning — single-sex, coed and those with religious affiliations — demonstrate varying degrees of acceptance for changing norms.

Mills College in Oakland, California, recently became the first U.S. women’s college to declare it would accept undergraduate applications from “self-identified women” and people “assigned female at birth who do not fit into the gender binary,” effective the semester that starts January 2015.

Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts, followed with a similar announcement last week. Administrators at other prominent women’s colleges also are weighing changes.

(via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

16 9 / 2014

fuckyeahqueerpeopleofcolor:

"Nepantla: A Journal Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color is an intentional community space. Our mission is to nurture, celebrate, and preserve diversity within the queer poetry community. Through this journal, we are attempting to center the lives and experiences of QPOC in contemporary America. Thus, we view the journal (and our reading series) as part of a whole artistic project and not individual fragments of work. We believe that (here) the high lyric must encounter colloquial narrative. Here, we must provide space to celebrate both our similarities and our differences. We are one community with an array of experiences; we write in different formats, in different tones, of different circumstances. Nepantla is not the sort of journal that can project a singular voice (not if we want to reflect the various realities of our community). Nepantla is a journal of multiplicity, of continual reinvention."

(Source: colorlines.com)

28 8 / 2014

ohshitimingradschool:

ill-dodongo-your-cavern:

AHHH TWO-SPIRIT REGALIA

THEY ARE SO CUTE

credit

queerstudiesoregonstate have you seen this?

Thanks! Yayayaaaay!

(via birdrhetorics)

28 8 / 2014

ohshitimingradschool:

ajuliettetlalli:

sicosa:

~La Pareja~
I just wanted to see some queer latinx art sooo. This was fun to do because of the lighting and it was not fun to do because of the lighting.Denim is tough. Branches are tough, leaves are tough. Flesh is fun and flexible. I wanted expressive strokes! I think I delivered kinda. As with every piece I learned a thing or two.
Hope someone out there enjoys!

😍😍😍

another one for queerstudiesoregonstate

Love it!

ohshitimingradschool:

ajuliettetlalli:

sicosa:

~La Pareja~

I just wanted to see some queer latinx art sooo. This was fun to do because of the lighting and it was not fun to do because of the lighting.Denim is tough. Branches are tough, leaves are tough. Flesh is fun and flexible. I wanted expressive strokes! I think I delivered kinda. As with every piece I learned a thing or two.

Hope someone out there enjoys!

😍😍😍

another one for queerstudiesoregonstate

Love it!

(via birdrhetorics)

29 6 / 2014

transstudent:

Want to share your story? Inside Out is looking for short trans youth narratives to spread trans visibility! Click here to learn more!

transstudent:

Want to share your story? Inside Out is looking for short trans youth narratives to spread trans visibility! Click here to learn more!


(via lgbtgivesmehope)

29 6 / 2014

michaeljfaris:

In May, my friend Ersula, an assistant professor at Arizona State, had a run-in with a police officer—one that seems pretty clearly a case of racial profiling and police violence. The ASU ethnic studies faculty summarize the events in their call for an investigation:

On the evening of May…

28 6 / 2014

27 6 / 2014